What’s booking: Áine Toner has a new book roundup for your reading list

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Hodder & Stoughton, £16.99

The prisoner of BA Paris

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The prisoner of BA Paris

The prisoner of BA Paris

Available November 3rd, the author’s latest novels bounce back and forth as we learn about Amelie’s life. A survivor, she is alone in the world after her father died and her mother is long dead. Knowing that she can only rely on herself, she flees Paris for London and gradually makes friends who genuinely care about her, eventually getting a job in the magazine industry. Through a series of basic threats to her future, she agrees to a marriage to someone who turns out to be, well, not exactly who he says he is. Everything is wrong when she wakes up in a dark room to find that she has been kidnapped. But by whom? And for what reason? As she adjusts to her surroundings, Amelia realizes that she feels much more secure in her incarceration than married to her new husband. Expect the action to pick up as you near the end of the novel.

The Cruise by Catherine Cooper

HarperCollins, £8.99

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The Cruise by Catherine Cooper


The Cruise by Catherine Cooper

The Cruise by Catherine Cooper

Released on November 10, Catherine is known for her claustrophobic and low-key reads, the modern day equivalent of a locked room mystery. Her third book is no different as all of the characters live aboard a luxury cruise ship. It sounds idyllic until one of the ship’s dancers, Lola, disappears during a New Year’s Eve party and her partner is robbed. Fast forward two weeks into the new year and since the ship is out of service there is only an emergency crew on board. That doesn’t stop scary things from happening though, like people going missing… and well, not exactly showing up. No one knows who is responsible for the crimes, why those particular people are being chosen, or who will be next. Catherine seamlessly blends life on a luxury cruiser – the lack of glamor when you don’t sleep above the waterline – with the terrifying reality that there’s a villain in the crew. Just as exciting and entertaining as her two previous books.

A Murderous Christmas at Honeychurch Hall by Hannah Dennison

Policeman, £9.99

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A Murderous Christmas at Honeychurch Hall by Hannah Dennison


A Murderous Christmas at Honeychurch Hall by Hannah Dennison

A Murderous Christmas at Honeychurch Hall by Hannah Dennison

Released Nov. 10, antiques expert and former TV star Kat Sandford is gearing up for a Christmas gala and silent auction at the local estate. But when the “help” is gone, the lady of the house, Lady Lavinia, has replaced her with a power couple who have had more than their fair share of the limelight. Kat has her own problems, apart from the newcomers – who have a keen sense of doing things their own way – her prize Barbie (with an emerald necklace) has been stolen. When a stranger swings into the village and is later found dead in the Victorian log, another body quickly follows and suddenly the neighbors have plenty to do, regardless of suspicious skin rashes and romantic novelists. And what about the mysterious celebrity flying in from Monaco as the guest of honor at the gala? One thing is certain: live, no one at Honeychurch Hall experiences smooth sailing.

Greta Thunberg’s climate book

Allen Lane, £25 (eBook £12.99)

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Greta Thunberg's climate book


Greta Thunberg’s climate book

Greta Thunberg’s climate book

When one of the world’s leading environmental activists publishes a book called The Climate Book, you pretty much know what to expect. That doesn’t make it any less compelling to read – Greta Thunberg asked some of the brightest minds in the fight against global warming (and some leading voices you might not expect, like Margaret Atwood) to explain in detail how climate works , how humanity is wreaking havoc and what to do next. At over 450 pages, it’s not the easiest of readings – the content is heavy, and quite scholarly at times – but it’s broken down into bite-sized chunks, so definitely digestible. Thunberg offers some glimmers of hope, but overall it is sobering reading and it must be clear that much needs to be done – especially by governments and those responsible. Review by Prudence Wade.

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