Meet the woman running her successful business from a YACHT sailing around the world

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Erin Carey is no ordinary mother of three — she’s the only person on earth to run a PR agency from the deck of a yacht while sailing to exotic destinations with her family.

The 41-year-old, originally from Sydney, decided to turn her family’s life around after watching the 2016 documentary Maidentrip.

Back then, thanks to their mortgage and three children under the age of six, Erin and her husband Dave were unable to give up everything and embark on the adventure of a lifetime.

“We decided to work backwards and calculated how much money we thought it would take to buy a boat and take two years of unpaid leave from work. Then we figured how we could make that kind of money,” Erin told FEMAIL.

For two years they saved, cut expenses, sold personal belongings and rented a guest room in their home to international university students while their children shared the other bedroom.

The family sailed their 47ft yacht to the Caribbean in 2018 and has traveled to more than 15 countries to date.

Erin Carey (pictured) is the only businesswoman in the world to run a PR agency from a yacht at sea

The 41-year-old, who is originally from Sydney, sailed to the Caribbean with her family (pictured) in 2018 after watching Laura Dekker's documentary Maidentrip

The 41-year-old, who is originally from Sydney, sailed to the Caribbean with her family (pictured) in 2018 after watching Laura Dekker’s documentary Maidentrip

Erin says her PR agency Roam Generation is unique as the company focuses on travel, leisure and luxury while operating from the yacht and she works with clients from all over the world.

Erin added that sailing is no longer reserved for “rich white men in their 60s” and is a lifestyle or hobby that anyone can take up.

“Over the past decade, we’ve seen the popularity of sailing video blogs explode on YouTube. Channels like Sailing La Vagabonde, SV Delos and Ryan and Sophie Sailing have helped change the perspective of sailing,” she said.

“Behan and Jamie Gifford also run a coaching business called Sailing Totem, which provides mentoring, guidance, resources and hands-on support to help ordinary people make a successful transition into cruise life.

“The best thing about working from a boat is the flexibility and endless inspiration. My day can be freely designed as I like it.”

Currently, Erin and her family live near a town called Marina di Ragusa in southern Sicily for the European winter.

“As soon as the weather is more stable, we will sail to Greece and Turkey,” she said.

“The best thing about working from a boat is the flexibility and endless inspiration.  My day is free to do as I please,

“The best thing about working from a boat is the flexibility and endless inspiration. My day is free to do as I please,” Erin told FEMAIL. Currently the company is in a town called Marina di Ragusa in southern Sicily for the winter

In addition to running a business, Erin and Dave homeschool their three children.

“Moving onto a boat when the kids were three, six and eight meant we had to homeschool them and to be honest that was the hardest part of this whole journey,” said Erin.

“The two younger ones are currently attending a local school in Italy (where they only speak Italian) but will be going back to boating school as soon as we set sail in about 6 weeks.”

The children also share a room due to the limited space.

As far as the children's education is concerned, the three boys have to do homeschooling and are also learning Italian

As far as the children’s education is concerned, the three boys have to do homeschooling and are also learning Italian

Erin and her partner learned to sail during an intensive week-long course on board

Erin and her partner learned to sail during an intensive week-long course on board

Erin and Dave learned to sail during an intensive week-long course on board.

“Nautilus Sailing offers courses in the South Pacific as well as other Mediterranean and Caribbean destinations. You vacation on board a yacht and learn to sail at the same time. They’re the perfect solution because you really get a great taste of boating life before you sell your house or quit your job,” said Erin.

She added that participants go home with a qualification that allows them to charter a boat anywhere in the world.

When Covid-19 broke out, the family were already in Australia, staying in Adelaide for 18 months before returning the boat to the Azores a year ago

When Covid-19 broke out, the family were already in Australia, staying in Adelaide for 18 months before returning the boat to the Azores a year ago

The couple bought their boat in Grenada in the Caribbean and spent 18 months exploring the Windward and Leeward Islands.

They then sailed across the Atlantic towards the Mediterranean, which involved 17 days of non-stop sailing.

“We stopped in the Azores, where we stayed for three months, before flying back to Australia via Thailand for six weeks,” said Erin.

When Covid-19 struck, the family were already in Australia, staying in Adelaide for 18 months before returning the boat to the Azores a year ago.

In the last 12 months they have been to Portugal, Spain, Tunisia, Malta and Italy.

The family has traveled to 15 countries so far.  In the last 12 months they have been to Portugal, Spain, Tunisia, Malta and Italy

The family has traveled to 15 countries so far. In the last 12 months they have been to Portugal, Spain, Tunisia, Malta and Italy

While life at sea can be lonely at times, the family always enjoys sailing and visiting new places.

While life at sea can be lonely at times, the family always enjoys sailing and visiting new places. “Thankfully the good outweighs the bad, at least we can feel alive out here and explore the world in our free time,” Erin said

But life at sea can get tough at times as the family lives in close quarters with little opportunity to socialize with others.

“Last season was lonely. We hardly met other children and friends were few and far between. That means we have to rely on each other a lot,” Erin said.

“We spend a lot of time together as a family and it can be tough, but I know it will definitely bring us closer in the long run.”

Sometimes it can get tight and living and working on a boat has its limits.

“We don’t own a car, we have a hand shower and limited hot water, we also have limited electricity and water when at anchor. We have very few amenities like home,” said Erin.

But it’s not all bad, because the family can experience different ways of life.

“Luckily the good outweighs the bad, at least we can feel alive out here and explore the world in our free time,” she said.

What’s the best thing about life on a boat?

– Flexibility

– Endless inspiration

– Can easily travel to other countries

– Getting to know other cultures and being able to visit new places

What’s the worst thing about living on a boat?

– Small squares

– Fewer people to interact with

– Seasickness

– Stormy seas

– Homeschooling children

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